New Brew News: Workbench IPA Third Draft & Second Draft Bottles

By Iain Smith

It feels like only yesterday that we were writing about the second beer in the Workbench IPA series, and here we are announcing that you can expect to see Third Draft on tap in your local from later this week!

The Workbench IPA Project has exceeded our expectations in terms of response from you lovely drinkers, so before we get into what makes number three special, a huge thank you to everyone who’s picked up a bottle or had a pint of either of the first two beers in the series.

Workbench IPA Second Draft is one of the fastest-selling keg beers we’ve ever produced, to the point that we sold out of kegs long before the bottles were conditioned enough to sell and the brewery is also empty of Workbench #1 bottles! We are delighted to say, though, that Workbench Second Draft are now available from the Fyne Ales website and should be gracing the shelves of your local bottle shop very soon! Look out for the signature Kev Grey artwork in red on the shelves from later this week.

Buy Workbench IPA Second Draft bottles here.

Now, on to Workbench IPA Third Draft. The new beer in the series is a test of the effects of filtration on hop flavours – one of the key differences between Sanda Blonde and the first two Workbench IPA’s is the level of filtration of the beer before it goes into keg. Of course, both Workbench drafts featured significantly increased hop bills compared to Sanda, so for Workbench #3, we decided to do an IPA with a similar level of hops to WB1 and WB2, but with filtration similar to Sanda Blonde, in the hop of combining the clean, drinkability of our core range beer with the bold hoppiness of the Workbench beers.

Furthermore, we based the recipe for the beer loosely on Sanda Blonde. Three of the four hops found in Workbench IPA Third Draft are the same as those in Sanda  - Citra and Nelson Sauvin during the boil, and a dry-hopping schedule using Cascade, though Workbench uses T90 pellets as opposed to the whole-leaf dry-hopping of Sanda Blonde. The additional hop is T90 Centennial during dry-hop, chosen to give a resinous finish of the beer and offer balance against the fruity/floral Nelson and Cascade combination.

The resulting beer is super-interesting for anyone who’s tried Sanda Blonde; Workbench IPA third Draft offers hints of the beer it’s based on, but everything is amplified and the Centennial cuts across the other hop flavours for a deeper, more satisfying taste. It’s a clean, fruity and satisfying drink and though not as punchy with tropical fruit flavours as WB1 or as earthy and resinous as WB2, it offers a super-balanced flavour profile.

If you pick up a bottle of Workbench 2 or a pint of Workbench 3 in the next couple of weeks, be sure to give us a shout and let us know what you think – we’re still looking for feedback for the fourth (and possibly final) beer in the series!

Cheers!